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is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
everything i posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very briefly about the nsa, and that is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. what the nsa has been doing him as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts of what they call metadata on your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was recently disclosed, and the problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection
may have passed, but the threat of terrorism never passed. >> they believe that the nsa surveillance programs helped track the emerging threat. the president announced some reforms on friday in those programs. and had tough words for the nsa leaker edward snowden, said he was not a patriot. take a look. >> mr. snowden's been charged with three felonies. if he believes what he did was right, then like every american citizen, electric come here, appear before the court with a lawyer, and make his case. >> so, what have you been able to learn about what u.s. officials are trying to do to get snowden right now? >> some officials i've talked to wish that a deal could be struck to bring him back to the u.s. make no mistake. one official said he has done irrefutable damage. the more t
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
germany. >> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitress, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for her work, for her films, she found she gets stopped a lot at the airport and not anything like what you might get stopped for at the airport for. she's been stopped dozens and dozens of times at the airport. for interrogations that sometimes last for hours. miss poitress started taking extraordinary precautions with her data using encrypted e-mail, working on computers that were not connected to the internet. stashing her notes in safe deposit boxes. she kept on, though, getting stopped at the airport. starting in 2006, she was detained and questioned like that more than 40 times. in april of last year, wrote about what had been happening to laura poitress as she tried to travel, then finally, finally after that public attention, and that article from, the airport interrogations of laura poitras stopped. she found, okay, she can
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
. >>> the man who helped expose the nsa secrets isn't done. he said he's going to release more documents. what does very? >>> this man could be the largest person alive. he can't move on his own and until now hadn't left his bed in two years but why are we telling this? help is on the way. the king of saudi arabia is bringing that help. we're going to tell you this amazing story. >>> an upsetting story two day care workers fired for allegedly posting cruel pictures on instagram making fun of the children they're supposed to be taking care of. we'll speak live with one mother who says one of the pictures mocked her son who has a delayed speech development. >>> first, breaking overnight an airtran flight forced to make an emergency landing in memphis, tennessee. the plane was traveling from baltimore to austin, texas, when officials say a passenger tried to open an emergency exit mid flight. cnn's christine romans is following the developments for us. >> a lot of questions about the motive behind this man who walked to the back of the airplane and tried to open this door. 120 passengers on board
for the reporting from cleveland. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden is free and any moment now may be speaking for the first time since russia dpragranted him a year-long asylum. apparently he's staying with some americans he met online and even has a job waiting for him if he wants it. phil black joins us live from moscow this morning. good morning, phil. >> good morning, chris. the job offer comes from a founder of a popular networking site often described as the russian version of facebook. the lawyer says he's surrounding himself by people he thinks he can trust, people who reached out to him online while stranded at the airport and he says they include american citizens. that man with his back to the camera is edward snowden and this was the moment he left moscow's airport after six weeks ther there. he's' according to his lawyer who is standing next to him in the photo. this document grants snowden permission to live in russia for one year which also keeps him beyond the reach of the united states for that time. ku kucharena describes his location as secret and safe. >> translator: he sa
. also on the show, general michael hayden, the former nsa and cia director, and an appearance by glenn downey, former executive editor of "the washington post." the sunday network tv talk shows are on c-span radio and brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. atin, rebroadcasts begin noon eastern with nbc's meet the week, 2:00, abc's this p.m., fox news sunday, 3:00, state of the union, and for clock p.m. eastern time, ace the nation from cbs. you can listen to them all on c- in thedio on 90.1 fm washington dc area. across the country, on xm satellite radio channel 119. -o online to c-span radio -- c sort of anti-me suburb or person who thinks that everybody needs to live in new york city. i was very sensitive to coming across as an espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. i was more drawn -- the trends were so undeniable, and the fact that there is a shift in the way suburban america is perceived by the people that live
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
snowden expose the nsa, now a government target. brand-new information in just overnight. >> and couch potato, bryan. >> yeah. this new gadget is for you. how you can watch tv without even sitting up. i want glasses where you can be on tv without -- >> that would be interesting. you'd be at home right now. >> i would be. what makes your family smile? backflips and cartwheels. love, warmth. here, try this. backflips and camm, ok!s. ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes going on. mmmm! breakfast i'm very impressed. this is a great cereal! honey bunches of oats. i hear you crunching. ♪ ♪ (vo) purina cat chow. 50 years of feeding great relationship reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. everybody has different ideas, goals, appetite for risk. you can't say 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. find out why 9 out of 10your large professional investors choose ishares for their etf
're following on "world news now." >>> nsa whistle-blower edward snowden has left the airport in moscow for the first time in more than a month. awarded temporary asylum by russia. and he's now in an undisclosed location in russia. the white house reportedly furious. >>> strong reaction to russia's announcement to enforce a new law that cwn on gay rights activism during next year's winter olympics. some gay supporters in the u.s. are asking for a boycott on russian products, vodka and participating in the games themselves. >>> one day after another session of record nighs on wall street, traders and investors are eagerly awaiting the july jobs report later this morning, expected to indicate a strengthening job market. >>> in the mountains of northern georgia, rescue crews had to pull two frightened teenagers to safely after a flash flood swept their truck on to a small island. more rains expected in the southeast today. those are some of our top stories on this friday, august 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good friday morning. we have tai filling in for d
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
the president close. is it nsa stuff, what is it? it has become more common since the late 1990s to talk about this. obviously because the country did it, went through it in '98 with president clinton. it's not, you know, impeachment is always a political tool. there's always some political element to it, obviously, because there is no definition of high crimes and misdemeanors. what is that? every generation, every congress, whoever wants to do it can redefine it. it's a kind of crazy armageddon. and i think that it's a sign of a certain derangement as we've talked about a lot on the part of any opponent of an incumbent president to go to this because you're trying to delegitimize the president who holds the office. it happened when conservatives did it with bush. it happened with conservatives and clinton that was strong push to delegitimize the president and a lot of people did not believe deserved to be president and that's what this talk is about now. it's the deepest, most significant kind of attack that you could make on a president and it will be interesting to see if it's coburn just
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
, the partner of glen greenwald, who exposed nsa secrets -- the white house says it was informed of miranda's detention but did not ask britain to hold on to him. >>> the man who created facebook learned about a flaw firsthand. someone hacked into mark zuckerberg's private facebook page just to prove he can, exposing the site's flaw. the hacker found a glitch that allows anyone to post on a stranger's wall. >> i condemn this report. i never asked them that i want 4,000 or 5,000. okay, i found a vulnerability. >> facebook encourages hackers to test the site and pays them for any problems they expose. >>> the cia now admits it helped overthrow iran's prime minister in 1953. that is a first. the admission comes in a newly declassified document. the cia pulled off the coup through propaganda and the secret use of other leaders in iran. iran had threatened to nationalize oil production which would have severely hurt the u.s. economy. >>> you know the old saying, always keep your eye on the ball? this might be why. >> chandler throws and pam oliver, wham. >> the camera captures the moment and we
the republican party. you see it manifest in various debates. you see it in the debate about n.s.a. insure veeps -- surveillance program. you see it with aid to egypt. there's no question what rand paul is leading the movement for a very different kind of republican foreign policy. i don't know who's going to prevail in that debate. we'll know when the republicans choose a nominee in 2016. host: go to john in minnesota on our republican line. caller: i was wondering why israel doesn't get involved? we pour all the money into israel. seem like this is more concerning them than us. they just sit back and don't do anything. just take our money. it's because of dick cheney and the neocons that we can't get coalition that the rest of the world don't trust us because of iraq. host: what is israel doing now? guest: israel is doing what they ought to be doing. most of the world would want them to do is stand on the sidelines and their producting themselves and preparing themselves in case syria decides it use chemical weapons against them. i don't know anybody including critics of the president, wa
at the fisa debate. a lot of people looked at other stories we wrote about fisa, and about nsa spying and that sort of thing. it put a human face, i think, on the otherwise inpenetrable government bureaucracy system going on. nobody ever really stands exactly -- don't understand what is going on when nsa decides to tap someone's phone. and it was a nice way to sort of show that to people. >> i agree with john when he mentioned that people seem to be more plugged in to politics now than they have ever been. there are part of the explosion of media outlet on capitol hill covering politics since 2006, 2007.ort what you see is that people are only going places that reenforce their already-held opinions. so it's important -- we all -- all of our organizations do really well, is to provide an independent viewpoint or independent look at what is going on in in washington that is simplified enough for the common person, the nonpolitical person to understand but nuanced enough that, you know, you're not boiling it down to something where they're not getting anything out of it. like, i was talk
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
not have any further announcements. i am wanting to ask about the nsa's surveillance programs. the threat that they have identified help bolster the case that the surveillance is needed? >> i will not blend those two stories, or those two issues together. haveve a threat that we advised the public about. we have discussed with you in the media, and we are interacting with that threat. we have some issues with unauthorized disclosure of classified inspiration. -- information. we are in a debate about that. we have to protect our security, and the balance in providing security, and protecting privacy is something we are working on. we are working on what that threat represents, and how we can act against it paid we also want to ensure the protection and security of our american people here at home and abroad. i would not blend the two issues. operationally, if the aq kior is weakened, doesn't make it easier, or harder, in terms of all cried as ability to organize a worldwide attack? that some counterterrorism experts might be able to address this with greater detail. the al qaeda core a hea
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)